Histeria

Hetalia x History Fan Comics

Posts tagged aph: scotland

141 notes

Okay not gonna lie: The main reason I wanted to do this comic was because I couldn’t get the picture of England all, “GRRRR,” out of my head. And it’s based on fact, actually—during the reception for Mary’s and Francis’s wedding, the English ambassador just watched on pretty, “Kfkajfrarrrrr,” at all the happiness, and at the marital tie that Scotland and France now possessed.
As for the wedding itself, Mary’s crown was so heavy, people had to hold it in place on her head, and finally just take it off. Stress! They - Mary and Francis - married on 24 April, 1558, which made Francis the king consort of Scotland. Mary was 15, making Francis 14, and both were happy. That makes me happy! But then, when you’re that old, you like anyone who likes you, so. But they were happy regardless. :)
Not touched on in these happier/lighter comics is the rest of the Guise family. They’re up to some stuff, and it’s not all good. :( They will be addressed though. SO FEAR NOT!
LINKS:
I combined last comic’s and this one together, cuz they don’t have much that you can’t find in any of the other links, but here.
Mary’s first wedding dress!Help you understand a bit more about Catherine de Medicis.

Okay not gonna lie: The main reason I wanted to do this comic was because I couldn’t get the picture of England all, “GRRRR,” out of my head. And it’s based on fact, actually—during the reception for Mary’s and Francis’s wedding, the English ambassador just watched on pretty, “Kfkajfrarrrrr,” at all the happiness, and at the marital tie that Scotland and France now possessed.

As for the wedding itself, Mary’s crown was so heavy, people had to hold it in place on her head, and finally just take it off. Stress! They - Mary and Francis - married on 24 April, 1558, which made Francis the king consort of Scotland. Mary was 15, making Francis 14, and both were happy. That makes me happy! But then, when you’re that old, you like anyone who likes you, so. But they were happy regardless. :)

Not touched on in these happier/lighter comics is the rest of the Guise family. They’re up to some stuff, and it’s not all good. :( They will be addressed though. SO FEAR NOT!

LINKS:

I combined last comic’s and this one together, cuz they don’t have much that you can’t find in any of the other links, but here.

Mary’s first wedding dress!
Help you understand a bit more about Catherine de Medicis.

(Source: histeriacomic)

Filed under aph: scotland aph: france mary stuart francis ii europe 1551-1600 CE

223 notes

If there are any truths you will always find about Mary, of which there is virtually no argument:
Mary was loved throughout France; the king of France, Henry II, set her on a higher pedestal than his own daughters.
Everyone sang praise of her beauty. Everyone. That’s why I don’t like most portraits of Mary; they make her look like something not powerfully pretty. 
Catherine de Medicis was not at all Mary’s biggest fan.
This conversation legitimately happened you guys, oh my God. 
So Mary finally arrives after a two-month journey from Roscoff to Saint-Germain, where she will meet the royal family. I mean, she’s gonna be marrying the dauphin, she may as well meet him, right? So Mary goes to the nursery, and starts playing with Francis (the dauphin). Francis was a year younger than Mary, and sickly, but he and Mary were getting along really, really well. Like, amazingly well. As in the French court was a-twitter like cupids; that’s how well they got along. 
The queen of France was Catherine de Medicis (Italian), and if anything, she loved her children; whatever ill acts she did or did not commit, it’s usually brushed to the side with the excuse that it was for her children. So Catherine walks in on this energetic little girl playing with her sick and timid littler boy, and it’s—well. Just read the comic. This little in-law stuff continues.
So upon landing in France and being surrounded by fancy things instead of rougher things, Mary is in love, and soon forgets that grey, rainy island for this beautiful and … fancy place. And it. Is. Sad. Arriving, Mary only knew her native language. Scots. She picked up enough French to communicate with kids her age on her way to Saint-Germain, and in her lessons she also learned Latin, Spanish, Greek, and Italian. She never forgot her Scots, but for the rest of her life, Mary preferred to communicate in French, even when she was in Scotland, and spell her name ‘Marie’. Mary was really smart, extremely devout in her religion (Catholicism), and was skilled in several arts. 
Girl’s pretty awesome. Why, you could almost say she’s a Mary Stuart.
Yeah I’m done. That—that was bad.
(Links next comic!)

If there are any truths you will always find about Mary, of which there is virtually no argument:

  • Mary was loved throughout France; the king of France, Henry II, set her on a higher pedestal than his own daughters.
  • Everyone sang praise of her beauty. Everyone. That’s why I don’t like most portraits of Mary; they make her look like something not powerfully pretty. 
  • Catherine de Medicis was not at all Mary’s biggest fan.

This conversation legitimately happened you guys, oh my God. 

So Mary finally arrives after a two-month journey from Roscoff to Saint-Germain, where she will meet the royal family. I mean, she’s gonna be marrying the dauphin, she may as well meet him, right? So Mary goes to the nursery, and starts playing with Francis (the dauphin). Francis was a year younger than Mary, and sickly, but he and Mary were getting along really, really well. Like, amazingly well. As in the French court was a-twitter like cupids; that’s how well they got along. 

The queen of France was Catherine de Medicis (Italian), and if anything, she loved her children; whatever ill acts she did or did not commit, it’s usually brushed to the side with the excuse that it was for her children. So Catherine walks in on this energetic little girl playing with her sick and timid littler boy, and it’s—well. Just read the comic. This little in-law stuff continues.

So upon landing in France and being surrounded by fancy things instead of rougher things, Mary is in love, and soon forgets that grey, rainy island for this beautiful and … fancy place. And it. Is. Sad. Arriving, Mary only knew her native language. Scots. She picked up enough French to communicate with kids her age on her way to Saint-Germain, and in her lessons she also learned Latin, Spanish, Greek, and Italian. She never forgot her Scots, but for the rest of her life, Mary preferred to communicate in French, even when she was in Scotland, and spell her name ‘Marie’. Mary was really smart, extremely devout in her religion (Catholicism), and was skilled in several arts. 

Girl’s pretty awesome. Why, you could almost say she’s a Mary Stuart.

Yeah I’m done. That—that was bad.

(Links next comic!)

(Source: histeriacomic)

Filed under aph: scotland aph: france Mary Stuart catherine de medicis europe 1501-1550 CE

164 notes

I could seriously write so much on this moment alone, but as this is just a moment in time, the comic itself is far more character-driven. Which isn’t a bad thing! But now you gotta read! (Oh no….)
So let’s do a quick thang on the Auld Alliance! The Auld Alliance is the Franco-Scottish alliance officially borne in 1295, on February 23rd, though there was trade and cooperation as early as the 9th century. It was an agreement to help the other against England whenever England decided to act up against one of them. They both certainly helped each other, don’t get me wrong! But it seems like Scotland was always far more ready to help France out, no matter what, whereas France was a little more ~floof~ about it. (Shut up, floof is a word.) I’d continue on, but if you don’t already know about it, you may spoil yourself. ;) So I’ll keep quiet on the rest for right now.
You remember the last comic, right? Mary of Guise fell under attack, and told Scotland to, “Get her out.” (If not, you have to go refresh your memory!) So this comic takes place in Dumbarton, and France has come to pick Mary up from Scotland. (Quick recap: England’s waging war to force Scotland to hand Mary over so she can marry his king, and work towards taking control of Scotland.)
It’s very sad, but has its amusing moments!
So now it’s 28 July, 1548. There were a ton of tears – in the actual event! – between Mary, who was quite loved throughout Scotland as far as I can tell, and her mother. By ‘a ton’ I mean a ton. I may be wrong, but I think I read somewhere that Mary of Guise was crying so hard, they had to pull her back from Mary and take her away. (Can you blame her, though? Mary of Guise was losing her only daughter, after the death of all of her children before Mary.) I think the only thing that really comforted her was that Mary was going to France – Mary of Guise’s home country – and would be watched over by her uncles. (Which is a whole other story on its own.)
But more amusingly, you gotta hand it to little Mary. As a queen (five years old though she may have been), she had her own little group of Ladies in Waiting, right? They were all named Mary: Seton, Beaton, Livingstone, and Fleming. Popular name, huh? (Fun fact: The English ‘Mary’ - French version being ‘Marie’ - actually comes from the Icelandic ‘Maer’ which means virgin or maid.) So she and her Ladies board the ship, but don’t even get to take off right away due to storms. Aside from boredom from being on a ship for a week without going anywhere, Mary was unaffected; according to letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise, Mary was the only one on the ship who wasn’t sea-sick. In fact, she was running around and making fun of everyone else. Oh, Mary.
LINKS:
Letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise. It takes a bit of reading/scrolling/hunting, but they’re there!Scotland’s ‘Auld Alliance’ with France, by Elizabeth Bonner. PDF of the whole book. o_o I think. Bienvenue, mes amis, à Aubigny-sur-Nère ! THIS PLACE IS SO COOL. I WANNA GO.
I may have mentioned it before, but I also recommend the biography of Mary Stuart by Antonia Fraser!

I could seriously write so much on this moment alone, but as this is just a moment in time, the comic itself is far more character-driven. Which isn’t a bad thing! But now you gotta read! (Oh no….)

So let’s do a quick thang on the Auld Alliance! The Auld Alliance is the Franco-Scottish alliance officially borne in 1295, on February 23rd, though there was trade and cooperation as early as the 9th century. It was an agreement to help the other against England whenever England decided to act up against one of them. They both certainly helped each other, don’t get me wrong! But it seems like Scotland was always far more ready to help France out, no matter what, whereas France was a little more ~floof~ about it. (Shut up, floof is a word.) I’d continue on, but if you don’t already know about it, you may spoil yourself. ;) So I’ll keep quiet on the rest for right now.

You remember the last comic, right? Mary of Guise fell under attack, and told Scotland to, “Get her out.” (If not, you have to go refresh your memory!) So this comic takes place in Dumbarton, and France has come to pick Mary up from Scotland. (Quick recap: England’s waging war to force Scotland to hand Mary over so she can marry his king, and work towards taking control of Scotland.)

It’s very sad, but has its amusing moments!

So now it’s 28 July, 1548. There were a ton of tears – in the actual event! – between Mary, who was quite loved throughout Scotland as far as I can tell, and her mother. By ‘a ton’ I mean a ton. I may be wrong, but I think I read somewhere that Mary of Guise was crying so hard, they had to pull her back from Mary and take her away. (Can you blame her, though? Mary of Guise was losing her only daughter, after the death of all of her children before Mary.) I think the only thing that really comforted her was that Mary was going to France – Mary of Guise’s home country – and would be watched over by her uncles. (Which is a whole other story on its own.)

But more amusingly, you gotta hand it to little Mary. As a queen (five years old though she may have been), she had her own little group of Ladies in Waiting, right? They were all named Mary: Seton, Beaton, Livingstone, and Fleming. Popular name, huh? (Fun fact: The English ‘Mary’ - French version being ‘Marie’ - actually comes from the Icelandic ‘Maer’ which means virgin or maid.) So she and her Ladies board the ship, but don’t even get to take off right away due to storms. Aside from boredom from being on a ship for a week without going anywhere, Mary was unaffected; according to letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise, Mary was the only one on the ship who wasn’t sea-sick. In fact, she was running around and making fun of everyone else. Oh, Mary.

LINKS:

Letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise. It takes a bit of reading/scrolling/hunting, but they’re there!
Scotland’s ‘Auld Alliance’ with France, by Elizabeth Bonner. PDF of the whole book. o_o I think. 
Bienvenue, mes amis, à Aubigny-sur-Nère ! THIS PLACE IS SO COOL. I WANNA GO.

I may have mentioned it before, but I also recommend the biography of Mary Stuart by Antonia Fraser!

Filed under aph: scotland aph: france mary stuart british isles europe rough wooing 1501-1550 CE

96 notes

Aww yissss. WE ARE WHERE I WANTED TO BE IN JUNE, WHEN THIS ALL BEGAN.Okay. Ahhh, sorry—I’m so excited, I’m just bouncing around everywhere okay composure I have it I swear. The beautiful lady you see up there with Scotland is none other than the amazing Mary of Guise, herself! Widow to King James V, and mother of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots. This lady’s pretty cool, but that’s evident. Here’s the info you need:
Mary Stuart is born. (Dec. 7 (disputed), 1542)
James V dies. (Dec. 14, 1542)
Mary Stuart is crowned Queen of Scotland at … 9 months old. (1543)
Treaty of Greenwich: Basically, Henry VIII asks that she marry his son Edward when she’s old enough. (1543)
Back-and-Forth talks; this dude Arran thinks the proposal is beneficial to Scotland, but the people are like, “LOL FUCK YOU. (╯° ワ°)╯ ┻━┻” (1543)
Henry again proves himself to be a crybaby, and thus begins the War of the Rough Wooing to force the Scots to agree to the treaty. It lasts from (December) 1543 to 1550. (You’d think a guy with six wives would be better at this wooing thing.) When Henry dies, his son Edward continues until 1550.
(Side note: It wasn’t initially called the Rough Wooing. Instead, it was ‘coined’ in a way by George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly in Jean de Beaugué’s Histoire de la guerre d’Écosse pendant les campagnes 1548 et 1549 [History of Scottish War in 1548 and 1549], translated by Mr. Patrick Abercromby in 1707: “We lik’d not the manner of Wooing, and we could not stoop to be Bully’d into Love.”)As the title of the comic gives away, this is based on the Siege of Haddington, in 1548. Before the English took over the area, this is what happened. (Yes, this is English.)

Now, I couldn’t understand all of it, but this is what I got from the middle and following paragraphs:   ”On Monday, before going on to Edinburgh, the Queen (Mary of Guise) came around from behind the church to see the town. From the town came [firepower/cannon fire] and killed and injured many of those around her, likely 16 men, of one estimation. The queen was greatly upset, crying. Pedro Strozzi was shot through the thigh, his bone shattering.   ”The Queen went soon after to Dumbarton to see the young Queen off.”It is this attack, that Mary of Guise experiences first-hand, that confirms what she needs to do to protect her daughter; a mother will do anything to protect her child, and in this case, my friends, that is to get the wee queen Mary Stuart out of Scotland……And on her way to France. 
LINKS:
Bit of a different approach on the Rough Wooing. Henry VIII is scary. :(Hamilton Papers: 1543-1590; page 603 (this is where the passage above is from)Mary, Queen of Scots, biography, by Antonia FraserA picture of the siege. /o/The quote by Gordon, page 52.

Aww yissss. WE ARE WHERE I WANTED TO BE IN JUNE, WHEN THIS ALL BEGAN.

Okay. Ahhh, sorry—I’m so excited, I’m just bouncing around everywhere okay composure I have it I swear. The beautiful lady you see up there with Scotland is none other than the amazing Mary of Guise, herself! Widow to King James V, and mother of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots. This lady’s pretty cool, but that’s evident. Here’s the info you need:

  1. Mary Stuart is born. (Dec. 7 (disputed), 1542)
  2. James V dies. (Dec. 14, 1542)
  3. Mary Stuart is crowned Queen of Scotland at … 9 months old. (1543)
  4. Treaty of Greenwich: Basically, Henry VIII asks that she marry his son Edward when she’s old enough. (1543)
  5. Back-and-Forth talks; this dude Arran thinks the proposal is beneficial to Scotland, but the people are like, “LOL FUCK YOU. (╯° ワ°)╯ ┻━┻” (1543)
  6. Henry again proves himself to be a crybaby, and thus begins the War of the Rough Wooing to force the Scots to agree to the treaty. It lasts from (December) 1543 to 1550. (You’d think a guy with six wives would be better at this wooing thing.) When Henry dies, his son Edward continues until 1550.


(Side note: It wasn’t initially called the Rough Wooing. Instead, it was ‘coined’ in a way by George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly in Jean de Beaugué’s Histoire de la guerre d’Écosse pendant les campagnes 1548 et 1549 [History of Scottish War in 1548 and 1549], translated by Mr. Patrick Abercromby in 1707: “We lik’d not the manner of Wooing, and we could not stoop to be Bully’d into Love.”)

As the title of the comic gives away, this is based on the Siege of Haddington, in 1548. Before the English took over the area, this is what happened. (Yes, this is English.)

Now, I couldn’t understand all of it, but this is what I got from the middle and following paragraphs:

   ”On Monday, before going on to Edinburgh, the Queen (Mary of Guise) came around from behind the church to see the town. From the town came [firepower/cannon fire] and killed and injured many of those around her, likely 16 men, of one estimation. The queen was greatly upset, crying. Pedro Strozzi was shot through the thigh, his bone shattering.
   ”The Queen went soon after to Dumbarton to see the young Queen off.”

It is this attack, that Mary of Guise experiences first-hand, that confirms what she needs to do to protect her daughter; a mother will do anything to protect her child, and in this case, my friends, that is to get the wee queen Mary Stuart out of Scotland…

…And on her way to France. 

LINKS:

Bit of a different approach on the Rough Wooing. Henry VIII is scary. :(
Hamilton Papers: 1543-1590; page 603 (this is where the passage above is from)
Mary, Queen of Scots, biography, by Antonia Fraser
A picture of the siege. /o/
The quote by Gordon, page 52.

Filed under aph: scotland mary of guise british isles europe rough wooing siege of haddington 1501-1550 CE

89 notes

Just as a quick note: This topic is seriously some serious business. Unfortunately, this is one of the easiest ways to present in just one strip. (Though the boys are adorable in their pj’s. You can’t see it, but we gave Ireland shamrock-patterned pj’s. |D)
As I’ve said before—Irish history is something that takes patience. So in these comics and info sections, I know there are bits of information missing. However: I don’t feel comfortable including every single little thing. There is a ton of  s t u f f  for all of this, and I don’t want to overwhelm and confuse you. So, I tried to keep this short, sweet, and simple. Uh. Tried.So as we know, during the Irish War for Independence, there were also clashes between Catholics in Ireland and Protestants in Northern Ireland. After the war, the religious clashes also died down, but they were by no means over. Though, it wasn’t just religion that caused the two to fight. There were economic differences between them, as well as political (which, sadly, was also because of religion). Northern Ireland was actually quite well-off, whereas Ireland … wasn’t. So … woohoo.Don’t forget that Northern Ireland was not 100% Protestant! There was still a small handful of Catholics, but they were a definite minority. They didn’t receive quite the same, uh, liberties Protestants did. So in the late 1960’s, things in N. Ireland culminate, and explode.I often say, “Man! Wouldn’t it be awesome to live in this time and experience this first-hand?!” but I have absolutely [ZERO] desire to experience The Troubles. Imagine the violence everywhere. More than military or political, civilians were usually the victims; civilians that didn’t really have much to do with anything, other than being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Things were horrible—security checkpoints going into a grocery store, and being subjected to full-body searches. Uh, I purposefully pick the non-body scan line at the airport. There would be no way I’d be going grocery shopping in Belfast. Come on; who really needs milk and bread? This went on for 30+ years (with small sporadic ‘attacks,’ if that’s what you wanna call ‘em, happening even within the last 2 or 3 years), and over 3,000 people have died, more than half being civilians. It’s so bad, some have said that the psychological effects pretty much mirror those of Londoners’ during the Blitz in WWII. That’s … pretty bad, you guys. :(The comic here takes place in the late 1990’s, when things started calming down. (There’s no specific year, mostly because it’s just hard to pinpoint the ‘end’ y’know?) Norn’s got a bit of a fever, and his brothers are fretting over him—he’s really the only brother, after all, that can get along with all of them. Basically, what England and Ireland are talking about: In the Anglo-Irish Agreement (such an original title…), the UK and the (by now) Republic of Ireland would both have a say in Northern Irish politics. The time of the comic and the date of the signing of the agreement (1985) are more than a decade apart. My goal here, though, is for you to get information. 
Oh, also! FYI. The PM of the UK at the time was Margaret Thatcher. There’s a movie coming out soon, The Iron Lady, starring Meryl Streep, about Ms. Thatcher. I can’t wait to see it, and I hope they touch on this. We’ll have to see. :)
LINK:
Only one, and why? Cuz it’s a very beautiful link.THIS LINK MAY CONTAIN TRIGGERING CONTENT. Violence, blood, etc. Please click and view at your own discretion. Pictures of War - The Troubles.
I CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT COMIC. *____*

Just as a quick note: This topic is seriously some serious business. Unfortunately, this is one of the easiest ways to present in just one strip. (Though the boys are adorable in their pj’s. You can’t see it, but we gave Ireland shamrock-patterned pj’s. |D)

As I’ve said before—Irish history is something that takes patience. So in these comics and info sections, I know there are bits of information missing. However: I don’t feel comfortable including every single little thing. There is a ton of  s t u f f  for all of this, and I don’t want to overwhelm and confuse you. So, I tried to keep this short, sweet, and simple. Uh. Tried.

So as we know, during the Irish War for Independence, there were also clashes between Catholics in Ireland and Protestants in Northern Ireland. After the war, the religious clashes also died down, but they were by no means over. Though, it wasn’t just religion that caused the two to fight. There were economic differences between them, as well as political (which, sadly, was also because of religion). Northern Ireland was actually quite well-off, whereas Ireland … wasn’t. So … woohoo.

Don’t forget that Northern Ireland was not 100% Protestant! There was still a small handful of Catholics, but they were a definite minority. They didn’t receive quite the same, uh, liberties Protestants did. So in the late 1960’s, things in N. Ireland culminate, and explode.

I often say, “Man! Wouldn’t it be awesome to live in this time and experience this first-hand?!” but I have absolutely [ZERO] desire to experience The Troubles. Imagine the violence everywhere. More than military or political, civilians were usually the victims; civilians that didn’t really have much to do with anything, other than being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Things were horrible—security checkpoints going into a grocery store, and being subjected to full-body searches. Uh, I purposefully pick the non-body scan line at the airport. There would be no way I’d be going grocery shopping in Belfast. Come on; who really needs milk and bread? 

This went on for 30+ years (with small sporadic ‘attacks,’ if that’s what you wanna call ‘em, happening even within the last 2 or 3 years), and over 3,000 people have died, more than half being civilians. It’s so bad, some have said that the psychological effects pretty much mirror those of Londoners’ during the Blitz in WWII. That’s … pretty bad, you guys. :(

The comic here takes place in the late 1990’s, when things started calming down. (There’s no specific year, mostly because it’s just hard to pinpoint the ‘end’ y’know?) Norn’s got a bit of a fever, and his brothers are fretting over him—he’s really the only brother, after all, that can get along with all of them. Basically, what England and Ireland are talking about: In the Anglo-Irish Agreement (such an original title…), the UK and the (by now) Republic of Ireland would both have a say in Northern Irish politics. The time of the comic and the date of the signing of the agreement (1985) are more than a decade apart. My goal here, though, is for you to get information. 

Oh, also! FYI. The PM of the UK at the time was Margaret Thatcher. There’s a movie coming out soon, The Iron Lady, starring Meryl Streep, about Ms. Thatcher. I can’t wait to see it, and I hope they touch on this. We’ll have to see. :)

LINK:

Only one, and why? Cuz it’s a very beautiful link.
THIS LINK MAY CONTAIN TRIGGERING CONTENT. Violence, blood, etc. Please click and view at your own discretion. Pictures of War - The Troubles.

I CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT COMIC. *____*

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe anglo-irish agreement the troubles 1951-2000 CE

149 notes

EEEE ISN’T HE ADORABLE I JUST WANNA. HUG HIM. He’s so cute he’s so cute he’s so cuuuute.
SO ULSTER PLANTATION!! You can basically say that Ulster Plantation was the ‘birth’ of ‘Northern Ireland.’ Different ‘culture’, and all, I suppose? Now, as I’ve mentioned previously, Northern Ireland isn’t actually a country until much much later. But hey, America was around as a kid and wasn’t a country yet, so there ya go; there’s my reasoning. That’s all this comic is really doing? Northern Ireland is important, and I feel it’s often overlooked, much like Wales. :( Plus, we have to introduce him some time, right??
Well, that said, there are really no links for this that you can find in that Giant List of Links from the last comic about Ulster Plantation.
(Extra: The year in the tags is just my own estimation of when Northern Ireland, the character, may have actually appeared.)

EEEE ISN’T HE ADORABLE I JUST WANNA. HUG HIM. He’s so cute he’s so cute he’s so cuuuute.

SO ULSTER PLANTATION!! You can basically say that Ulster Plantation was the ‘birth’ of ‘Northern Ireland.’ Different ‘culture’, and all, I suppose? Now, as I’ve mentioned previously, Northern Ireland isn’t actually a country until much much later. But hey, America was around as a kid and wasn’t a country yet, so there ya go; there’s my reasoning. That’s all this comic is really doing? Northern Ireland is important, and I feel it’s often overlooked, much like Wales. :( Plus, we have to introduce him some time, right??

Well, that said, there are really no links for this that you can find in that Giant List of Links from the last comic about Ulster Plantation.

(Extra: The year in the tags is just my own estimation of when Northern Ireland, the character, may have actually appeared.)

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe ulster plantation 1751-1800 CE

94 notes

Ah! Ireland! Nice to see more of you. :)
As for Ulster Plantation, there’s not really a whole lot! Well, there is, but not (too much) in this comic. This is what you need to know:
England has this need to take over everything, right? Right. No one’s arguing this. Well, Ireland was certainly not an exception, but Ireland was (and is) certainly no pushover. (Wales and Scotland aren’t either! But there’s a reason they’re often called the Fighting Irish!) 
Technically, the Tudors had in fact taken over Ireland. Henry VIII had been king of Ireland, Elizabeth I, and James (I of England, VI of Scotland). Just cuz they ruled over Ireland, doesn’t mean that a whole lot of English were over there. So that’s what Ulster is for! The earls of northern Ireland had fled from the English (and Scots) to try and get help when forces advanced to take over the area, but whatever help they went to find never … happened. So, British parliament had taken over this area, Ulster Plantation, and assigned each county to either England or Scotland, though some were shared by both states. You don’t see Wales mentioned, do you? :( (As you can see in the comic, Scotland and England are still arguing.)
There were, mainly, three peoples living in the area: English, Irish (both those loyal to Great Britain and those … not-so-loyal), and Scottish. Today, much of the population is still the same/descended from them.
Ulster, soon, would become something much more.
LINKS:
Plantation of UlsterTons of Links o___o

Ah! Ireland! Nice to see more of you. :)

As for Ulster Plantation, there’s not really a whole lot! Well, there is, but not (too much) in this comic. This is what you need to know:

England has this need to take over everything, right? Right. No one’s arguing this. Well, Ireland was certainly not an exception, but Ireland was (and is) certainly no pushover. (Wales and Scotland aren’t either! But there’s a reason they’re often called the Fighting Irish!) 

Technically, the Tudors had in fact taken over Ireland. Henry VIII had been king of Ireland, Elizabeth I, and James (I of England, VI of Scotland). Just cuz they ruled over Ireland, doesn’t mean that a whole lot of English were over there. So that’s what Ulster is for! The earls of northern Ireland had fled from the English (and Scots) to try and get help when forces advanced to take over the area, but whatever help they went to find never … happened. So, British parliament had taken over this area, Ulster Plantation, and assigned each county to either England or Scotland, though some were shared by both states. You don’t see Wales mentioned, do you? :( (As you can see in the comic, Scotland and England are still arguing.)

There were, mainly, three peoples living in the area: English, Irish (both those loyal to Great Britain and those … not-so-loyal), and Scottish. Today, much of the population is still the same/descended from them.

Ulster, soon, would become something much more.

LINKS:

Plantation of Ulster
Tons of Links o___o

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: scotland british isles europe ulster plantation 1601-1650 CE

153 notes

Ah, finally. Part 2.Scotland’s flag. Scotland’s. Flag. Guys, it  exists; he got his way.Okay.  Scotland and his bad self aside, Ireland joins the UK, so the flag is altered to  include St. Patrick’s Cross. (That makes the one we see today.) But then Ireland  breaks away in 1927, with a few counties in the north deciding to remain part of  the UK. So St. Patrick’s Cross stays, (the Republic of) Ireland adopts their  current Tricolor, and although it’s unofficial, N. Ireland adopts the Red Hand  Flag, even though St. Patrick’s Cross still represents them in the Union  Flag.And the King’s Colours remains the same.However…. Someone  is missing…. (Wales, by the way.)Yes. There was a rush in 2007 to  design a new Union Flag that incorporated Wales! A ton of submissions were  entered that involved Dewi, leeks (one of Wales’ national emblems), and even …  anime characters. Submissions came in from all around the world, but in the end,  nothing was really changed. (As far as I can tell, the Welsh are all right with  this, prefering their Red Dragon Flag. I can’t blame them—I would,  too!)Besides the Red Dragon flag, Wales also has a different flag, much  resembling that of the other Cross-themed flags of the British Isles. It is St.  David’s Cross!Wales, Dewi, and St.  DavidProposal'Winners'Japanese  contributions….

Ah, finally. Part 2.

Scotland’s flag. Scotland’s. Flag. Guys, it exists; he got his way.



Okay. Scotland and his bad self aside, Ireland joins the UK, so the flag is altered to include St. Patrick’s Cross. (That makes the one we see today.) But then Ireland breaks away in 1927, with a few counties in the north deciding to remain part of the UK. So St. Patrick’s Cross stays, (the Republic of) Ireland adopts their current Tricolor, and although it’s unofficial, N. Ireland adopts the Red Hand Flag, even though St. Patrick’s Cross still represents them in the Union Flag.

And the King’s Colours remains the same.

However…. Someone is missing…. (Wales, by the way.)

Yes. There was a rush in 2007 to design a new Union Flag that incorporated Wales! A ton of submissions were entered that involved Dewi, leeks (one of Wales’ national emblems), and even … anime characters. Submissions came in from all around the world, but in the end, nothing was really changed. (As far as I can tell, the Welsh are all right with this, prefering their Red Dragon Flag. I can’t blame them—I would, too!)

Besides the Red Dragon flag, Wales also has a different flag, much resembling that of the other Cross-themed flags of the British Isles. It is St. David’s Cross!



Wales, Dewi, and St. David
Proposal
'Winners'
Japanese contributions….

(Source: histeriacomic)

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe union flag (uk) transcending 1801-1850 CE 2001-2050 CE

185 notes

Meanwhile, Wales is … still just  hangin’ out. (I wish I could hug him.)If you recall, Scotland finally  gave in and helped formed the United Kingdom (officially) in the early  eighteenth century. However, the Union Flag (aka the King’s Colours) has been  around for longer than that. (In case you forgot, refresh  your memory!)1606, to be exact! The only reason it says 1603 up  there is because that’s when King James VI of Scotland inherited, upon Elizabeth  I’s death, the throne of England, and Ireland. (Wales as well, of course.) Since  he ruled these separate states, he decided to give the personal unions a flag.  (Which would later be used in claiming countries with … no  flags….)He called this flag The King’s Colours! (Also, it’s known as  the Union Flag—it’s only a Union Jack when flown on specific vessels. If  you have one hanging in your room, as I do, please don’t call it a Jack!  At least, this is the opinion I’m given by most Brits.) It was comprised of Scotland’s St. Andrew’s Cross, and England’s St. George’s Cross. Yet…. All was  not hunky-dory. Scotland saw no reason that St. Andrew’s Cross should be placed  behind St. George’s Cross, and England saw no reason that St. George’s Cross  should be placed behind St. Andrew’s Cross. There were so many designs, oh my  gosh….I  mean, can you just imagine the fighting over trying to design this flag? I just.  Ahhh. (Sires and I came up with a dialogue for their fight, but alas. T’was too  long for our purposes. It was amusing, though!) Some of these designs were used,  though rarely, and only for certain things. Others weren’t used at all. /le  shrugWhile it’s definitely a national symbol of sorts during this time,  it doesn’t become an ‘official’ flag until 1801. And guys. Guys guys guys. That’s when it gets even better.Just wait for Part 2. :]Wiki actually has a pretty  decent wealth of info on the Union Flag!BBC News, of recent. (Fff, 2007.) 1 | 2

Meanwhile, Wales is … still just hangin’ out. (I wish I could hug him.)

If you recall, Scotland finally gave in and helped formed the United Kingdom (officially) in the early eighteenth century. However, the Union Flag (aka the King’s Colours) has been around for longer than that. (In case you forgot, refresh your memory!)

1606, to be exact! The only reason it says 1603 up there is because that’s when King James VI of Scotland inherited, upon Elizabeth I’s death, the throne of England, and Ireland. (Wales as well, of course.) Since he ruled these separate states, he decided to give the personal unions a flag. (Which would later be used in claiming countries with … no flags….)

He called this flag The King’s Colours! (Also, it’s known as the Union Flag—it’s only a Union Jack when flown on specific vessels. If you have one hanging in your room, as I do, please don’t call it a Jack! At least, this is the opinion I’m given by most Brits.) It was comprised of Scotland’s St. Andrew’s Cross, and England’s St. George’s Cross. Yet…. All was not hunky-dory. Scotland saw no reason that St. Andrew’s Cross should be placed behind St. George’s Cross, and England saw no reason that St. George’s Cross should be placed behind St. Andrew’s Cross. There were so many designs, oh my gosh….



I mean, can you just imagine the fighting over trying to design this flag? I just. Ahhh. (Sires and I came up with a dialogue for their fight, but alas. T’was too long for our purposes. It was amusing, though!) Some of these designs were used, though rarely, and only for certain things. Others weren’t used at all. /le shrug

While it’s definitely a national symbol of sorts during this time,  it doesn’t become an ‘official’ flag until 1801. And guys. Guys guys guys. That’s when it gets even better.

Just wait for Part 2. :]

Wiki actually has a pretty decent wealth of info on the Union Flag!
BBC News, of recent. (Fff, 2007.) 1 | 2

Filed under aph: england aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe union flag (uk) 1601-1650 CE