Histeria

Hetalia x History Fan Comics

Posts tagged british isles

164 notes

I could seriously write so much on this moment alone, but as this is just a moment in time, the comic itself is far more character-driven. Which isn’t a bad thing! But now you gotta read! (Oh no….)
So let’s do a quick thang on the Auld Alliance! The Auld Alliance is the Franco-Scottish alliance officially borne in 1295, on February 23rd, though there was trade and cooperation as early as the 9th century. It was an agreement to help the other against England whenever England decided to act up against one of them. They both certainly helped each other, don’t get me wrong! But it seems like Scotland was always far more ready to help France out, no matter what, whereas France was a little more ~floof~ about it. (Shut up, floof is a word.) I’d continue on, but if you don’t already know about it, you may spoil yourself. ;) So I’ll keep quiet on the rest for right now.
You remember the last comic, right? Mary of Guise fell under attack, and told Scotland to, “Get her out.” (If not, you have to go refresh your memory!) So this comic takes place in Dumbarton, and France has come to pick Mary up from Scotland. (Quick recap: England’s waging war to force Scotland to hand Mary over so she can marry his king, and work towards taking control of Scotland.)
It’s very sad, but has its amusing moments!
So now it’s 28 July, 1548. There were a ton of tears – in the actual event! – between Mary, who was quite loved throughout Scotland as far as I can tell, and her mother. By ‘a ton’ I mean a ton. I may be wrong, but I think I read somewhere that Mary of Guise was crying so hard, they had to pull her back from Mary and take her away. (Can you blame her, though? Mary of Guise was losing her only daughter, after the death of all of her children before Mary.) I think the only thing that really comforted her was that Mary was going to France – Mary of Guise’s home country – and would be watched over by her uncles. (Which is a whole other story on its own.)
But more amusingly, you gotta hand it to little Mary. As a queen (five years old though she may have been), she had her own little group of Ladies in Waiting, right? They were all named Mary: Seton, Beaton, Livingstone, and Fleming. Popular name, huh? (Fun fact: The English ‘Mary’ - French version being ‘Marie’ - actually comes from the Icelandic ‘Maer’ which means virgin or maid.) So she and her Ladies board the ship, but don’t even get to take off right away due to storms. Aside from boredom from being on a ship for a week without going anywhere, Mary was unaffected; according to letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise, Mary was the only one on the ship who wasn’t sea-sick. In fact, she was running around and making fun of everyone else. Oh, Mary.
LINKS:
Letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise. It takes a bit of reading/scrolling/hunting, but they’re there!Scotland’s ‘Auld Alliance’ with France, by Elizabeth Bonner. PDF of the whole book. o_o I think. Bienvenue, mes amis, à Aubigny-sur-Nère ! THIS PLACE IS SO COOL. I WANNA GO.
I may have mentioned it before, but I also recommend the biography of Mary Stuart by Antonia Fraser!

I could seriously write so much on this moment alone, but as this is just a moment in time, the comic itself is far more character-driven. Which isn’t a bad thing! But now you gotta read! (Oh no….)

So let’s do a quick thang on the Auld Alliance! The Auld Alliance is the Franco-Scottish alliance officially borne in 1295, on February 23rd, though there was trade and cooperation as early as the 9th century. It was an agreement to help the other against England whenever England decided to act up against one of them. They both certainly helped each other, don’t get me wrong! But it seems like Scotland was always far more ready to help France out, no matter what, whereas France was a little more ~floof~ about it. (Shut up, floof is a word.) I’d continue on, but if you don’t already know about it, you may spoil yourself. ;) So I’ll keep quiet on the rest for right now.

You remember the last comic, right? Mary of Guise fell under attack, and told Scotland to, “Get her out.” (If not, you have to go refresh your memory!) So this comic takes place in Dumbarton, and France has come to pick Mary up from Scotland. (Quick recap: England’s waging war to force Scotland to hand Mary over so she can marry his king, and work towards taking control of Scotland.)

It’s very sad, but has its amusing moments!

So now it’s 28 July, 1548. There were a ton of tears – in the actual event! – between Mary, who was quite loved throughout Scotland as far as I can tell, and her mother. By ‘a ton’ I mean a ton. I may be wrong, but I think I read somewhere that Mary of Guise was crying so hard, they had to pull her back from Mary and take her away. (Can you blame her, though? Mary of Guise was losing her only daughter, after the death of all of her children before Mary.) I think the only thing that really comforted her was that Mary was going to France – Mary of Guise’s home country – and would be watched over by her uncles. (Which is a whole other story on its own.)

But more amusingly, you gotta hand it to little Mary. As a queen (five years old though she may have been), she had her own little group of Ladies in Waiting, right? They were all named Mary: Seton, Beaton, Livingstone, and Fleming. Popular name, huh? (Fun fact: The English ‘Mary’ - French version being ‘Marie’ - actually comes from the Icelandic ‘Maer’ which means virgin or maid.) So she and her Ladies board the ship, but don’t even get to take off right away due to storms. Aside from boredom from being on a ship for a week without going anywhere, Mary was unaffected; according to letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise, Mary was the only one on the ship who wasn’t sea-sick. In fact, she was running around and making fun of everyone else. Oh, Mary.

LINKS:

Letters from de Brezé to Mary of Guise. It takes a bit of reading/scrolling/hunting, but they’re there!
Scotland’s ‘Auld Alliance’ with France, by Elizabeth Bonner. PDF of the whole book. o_o I think. 
Bienvenue, mes amis, à Aubigny-sur-Nère ! THIS PLACE IS SO COOL. I WANNA GO.

I may have mentioned it before, but I also recommend the biography of Mary Stuart by Antonia Fraser!

Filed under aph: scotland aph: france mary stuart british isles europe rough wooing 1501-1550 CE

96 notes

Aww yissss. WE ARE WHERE I WANTED TO BE IN JUNE, WHEN THIS ALL BEGAN.Okay. Ahhh, sorry—I’m so excited, I’m just bouncing around everywhere okay composure I have it I swear. The beautiful lady you see up there with Scotland is none other than the amazing Mary of Guise, herself! Widow to King James V, and mother of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots. This lady’s pretty cool, but that’s evident. Here’s the info you need:
Mary Stuart is born. (Dec. 7 (disputed), 1542)
James V dies. (Dec. 14, 1542)
Mary Stuart is crowned Queen of Scotland at … 9 months old. (1543)
Treaty of Greenwich: Basically, Henry VIII asks that she marry his son Edward when she’s old enough. (1543)
Back-and-Forth talks; this dude Arran thinks the proposal is beneficial to Scotland, but the people are like, “LOL FUCK YOU. (╯° ワ°)╯ ┻━┻” (1543)
Henry again proves himself to be a crybaby, and thus begins the War of the Rough Wooing to force the Scots to agree to the treaty. It lasts from (December) 1543 to 1550. (You’d think a guy with six wives would be better at this wooing thing.) When Henry dies, his son Edward continues until 1550.
(Side note: It wasn’t initially called the Rough Wooing. Instead, it was ‘coined’ in a way by George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly in Jean de Beaugué’s Histoire de la guerre d’Écosse pendant les campagnes 1548 et 1549 [History of Scottish War in 1548 and 1549], translated by Mr. Patrick Abercromby in 1707: “We lik’d not the manner of Wooing, and we could not stoop to be Bully’d into Love.”)As the title of the comic gives away, this is based on the Siege of Haddington, in 1548. Before the English took over the area, this is what happened. (Yes, this is English.)

Now, I couldn’t understand all of it, but this is what I got from the middle and following paragraphs:   ”On Monday, before going on to Edinburgh, the Queen (Mary of Guise) came around from behind the church to see the town. From the town came [firepower/cannon fire] and killed and injured many of those around her, likely 16 men, of one estimation. The queen was greatly upset, crying. Pedro Strozzi was shot through the thigh, his bone shattering.   ”The Queen went soon after to Dumbarton to see the young Queen off.”It is this attack, that Mary of Guise experiences first-hand, that confirms what she needs to do to protect her daughter; a mother will do anything to protect her child, and in this case, my friends, that is to get the wee queen Mary Stuart out of Scotland……And on her way to France. 
LINKS:
Bit of a different approach on the Rough Wooing. Henry VIII is scary. :(Hamilton Papers: 1543-1590; page 603 (this is where the passage above is from)Mary, Queen of Scots, biography, by Antonia FraserA picture of the siege. /o/The quote by Gordon, page 52.

Aww yissss. WE ARE WHERE I WANTED TO BE IN JUNE, WHEN THIS ALL BEGAN.

Okay. Ahhh, sorry—I’m so excited, I’m just bouncing around everywhere okay composure I have it I swear. The beautiful lady you see up there with Scotland is none other than the amazing Mary of Guise, herself! Widow to King James V, and mother of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots. This lady’s pretty cool, but that’s evident. Here’s the info you need:

  1. Mary Stuart is born. (Dec. 7 (disputed), 1542)
  2. James V dies. (Dec. 14, 1542)
  3. Mary Stuart is crowned Queen of Scotland at … 9 months old. (1543)
  4. Treaty of Greenwich: Basically, Henry VIII asks that she marry his son Edward when she’s old enough. (1543)
  5. Back-and-Forth talks; this dude Arran thinks the proposal is beneficial to Scotland, but the people are like, “LOL FUCK YOU. (╯° ワ°)╯ ┻━┻” (1543)
  6. Henry again proves himself to be a crybaby, and thus begins the War of the Rough Wooing to force the Scots to agree to the treaty. It lasts from (December) 1543 to 1550. (You’d think a guy with six wives would be better at this wooing thing.) When Henry dies, his son Edward continues until 1550.


(Side note: It wasn’t initially called the Rough Wooing. Instead, it was ‘coined’ in a way by George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly in Jean de Beaugué’s Histoire de la guerre d’Écosse pendant les campagnes 1548 et 1549 [History of Scottish War in 1548 and 1549], translated by Mr. Patrick Abercromby in 1707: “We lik’d not the manner of Wooing, and we could not stoop to be Bully’d into Love.”)

As the title of the comic gives away, this is based on the Siege of Haddington, in 1548. Before the English took over the area, this is what happened. (Yes, this is English.)

Now, I couldn’t understand all of it, but this is what I got from the middle and following paragraphs:

   ”On Monday, before going on to Edinburgh, the Queen (Mary of Guise) came around from behind the church to see the town. From the town came [firepower/cannon fire] and killed and injured many of those around her, likely 16 men, of one estimation. The queen was greatly upset, crying. Pedro Strozzi was shot through the thigh, his bone shattering.
   ”The Queen went soon after to Dumbarton to see the young Queen off.”

It is this attack, that Mary of Guise experiences first-hand, that confirms what she needs to do to protect her daughter; a mother will do anything to protect her child, and in this case, my friends, that is to get the wee queen Mary Stuart out of Scotland…

…And on her way to France. 

LINKS:

Bit of a different approach on the Rough Wooing. Henry VIII is scary. :(
Hamilton Papers: 1543-1590; page 603 (this is where the passage above is from)
Mary, Queen of Scots, biography, by Antonia Fraser
A picture of the siege. /o/
The quote by Gordon, page 52.

Filed under aph: scotland mary of guise british isles europe rough wooing siege of haddington 1501-1550 CE

89 notes

Just as a quick note: This topic is seriously some serious business. Unfortunately, this is one of the easiest ways to present in just one strip. (Though the boys are adorable in their pj’s. You can’t see it, but we gave Ireland shamrock-patterned pj’s. |D)
As I’ve said before—Irish history is something that takes patience. So in these comics and info sections, I know there are bits of information missing. However: I don’t feel comfortable including every single little thing. There is a ton of  s t u f f  for all of this, and I don’t want to overwhelm and confuse you. So, I tried to keep this short, sweet, and simple. Uh. Tried.So as we know, during the Irish War for Independence, there were also clashes between Catholics in Ireland and Protestants in Northern Ireland. After the war, the religious clashes also died down, but they were by no means over. Though, it wasn’t just religion that caused the two to fight. There were economic differences between them, as well as political (which, sadly, was also because of religion). Northern Ireland was actually quite well-off, whereas Ireland … wasn’t. So … woohoo.Don’t forget that Northern Ireland was not 100% Protestant! There was still a small handful of Catholics, but they were a definite minority. They didn’t receive quite the same, uh, liberties Protestants did. So in the late 1960’s, things in N. Ireland culminate, and explode.I often say, “Man! Wouldn’t it be awesome to live in this time and experience this first-hand?!” but I have absolutely [ZERO] desire to experience The Troubles. Imagine the violence everywhere. More than military or political, civilians were usually the victims; civilians that didn’t really have much to do with anything, other than being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Things were horrible—security checkpoints going into a grocery store, and being subjected to full-body searches. Uh, I purposefully pick the non-body scan line at the airport. There would be no way I’d be going grocery shopping in Belfast. Come on; who really needs milk and bread? This went on for 30+ years (with small sporadic ‘attacks,’ if that’s what you wanna call ‘em, happening even within the last 2 or 3 years), and over 3,000 people have died, more than half being civilians. It’s so bad, some have said that the psychological effects pretty much mirror those of Londoners’ during the Blitz in WWII. That’s … pretty bad, you guys. :(The comic here takes place in the late 1990’s, when things started calming down. (There’s no specific year, mostly because it’s just hard to pinpoint the ‘end’ y’know?) Norn’s got a bit of a fever, and his brothers are fretting over him—he’s really the only brother, after all, that can get along with all of them. Basically, what England and Ireland are talking about: In the Anglo-Irish Agreement (such an original title…), the UK and the (by now) Republic of Ireland would both have a say in Northern Irish politics. The time of the comic and the date of the signing of the agreement (1985) are more than a decade apart. My goal here, though, is for you to get information. 
Oh, also! FYI. The PM of the UK at the time was Margaret Thatcher. There’s a movie coming out soon, The Iron Lady, starring Meryl Streep, about Ms. Thatcher. I can’t wait to see it, and I hope they touch on this. We’ll have to see. :)
LINK:
Only one, and why? Cuz it’s a very beautiful link.THIS LINK MAY CONTAIN TRIGGERING CONTENT. Violence, blood, etc. Please click and view at your own discretion. Pictures of War - The Troubles.
I CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT COMIC. *____*

Just as a quick note: This topic is seriously some serious business. Unfortunately, this is one of the easiest ways to present in just one strip. (Though the boys are adorable in their pj’s. You can’t see it, but we gave Ireland shamrock-patterned pj’s. |D)

As I’ve said before—Irish history is something that takes patience. So in these comics and info sections, I know there are bits of information missing. However: I don’t feel comfortable including every single little thing. There is a ton of  s t u f f  for all of this, and I don’t want to overwhelm and confuse you. So, I tried to keep this short, sweet, and simple. Uh. Tried.

So as we know, during the Irish War for Independence, there were also clashes between Catholics in Ireland and Protestants in Northern Ireland. After the war, the religious clashes also died down, but they were by no means over. Though, it wasn’t just religion that caused the two to fight. There were economic differences between them, as well as political (which, sadly, was also because of religion). Northern Ireland was actually quite well-off, whereas Ireland … wasn’t. So … woohoo.

Don’t forget that Northern Ireland was not 100% Protestant! There was still a small handful of Catholics, but they were a definite minority. They didn’t receive quite the same, uh, liberties Protestants did. So in the late 1960’s, things in N. Ireland culminate, and explode.

I often say, “Man! Wouldn’t it be awesome to live in this time and experience this first-hand?!” but I have absolutely [ZERO] desire to experience The Troubles. Imagine the violence everywhere. More than military or political, civilians were usually the victims; civilians that didn’t really have much to do with anything, other than being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Things were horrible—security checkpoints going into a grocery store, and being subjected to full-body searches. Uh, I purposefully pick the non-body scan line at the airport. There would be no way I’d be going grocery shopping in Belfast. Come on; who really needs milk and bread? 

This went on for 30+ years (with small sporadic ‘attacks,’ if that’s what you wanna call ‘em, happening even within the last 2 or 3 years), and over 3,000 people have died, more than half being civilians. It’s so bad, some have said that the psychological effects pretty much mirror those of Londoners’ during the Blitz in WWII. That’s … pretty bad, you guys. :(

The comic here takes place in the late 1990’s, when things started calming down. (There’s no specific year, mostly because it’s just hard to pinpoint the ‘end’ y’know?) Norn’s got a bit of a fever, and his brothers are fretting over him—he’s really the only brother, after all, that can get along with all of them. Basically, what England and Ireland are talking about: In the Anglo-Irish Agreement (such an original title…), the UK and the (by now) Republic of Ireland would both have a say in Northern Irish politics. The time of the comic and the date of the signing of the agreement (1985) are more than a decade apart. My goal here, though, is for you to get information. 

Oh, also! FYI. The PM of the UK at the time was Margaret Thatcher. There’s a movie coming out soon, The Iron Lady, starring Meryl Streep, about Ms. Thatcher. I can’t wait to see it, and I hope they touch on this. We’ll have to see. :)

LINK:

Only one, and why? Cuz it’s a very beautiful link.
THIS LINK MAY CONTAIN TRIGGERING CONTENT. Violence, blood, etc. Please click and view at your own discretion. Pictures of War - The Troubles.

I CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT COMIC. *____*

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe anglo-irish agreement the troubles 1951-2000 CE

120 notes

CONTINUING ON FROM LAST TIME!!
What we see here is, kinda, the end of the Irish War for Independence. That paper England is handing over to Ireland is the Anglo-Irish Treaty. (I’d like to take this quick moment to point out that the Irish War for Independence was also known as the Anglo Irish War, and the (Black and) Tan War.)
What it essentially did was—hmm. The problem with the treaty was—nngh. Okay, good things out of the way, first: Ended the war. Yay! Provided the possibility of an autonomous Northern Ireland. Yay! Reduced number of British troops in Ireland. Yay! Ireland was no longer part of the UK. Yay! Everybody is as happy as a duck on a floaty. Yeah, that’s sarcasm. The, “Eh,” things: Ireland would no longer be part of the UK, but it was still part of the British Dominion, with the British Monarch still its Head of State. Ireland would also pay proportional debt to Britain from the war. So the kinda-dick-moves-but-should-have-been-expected-because-that’s-just-how-wars-and-treaties-work-and-we-have-to-get-used-to-it things: Britain would still control ports for security purposes. Ehh. The treaty would stand superior in Irish law.
The treaty would stand superior in Irish law. What this meant was that no matter what happened, this treaty would stand above anything. :| Wow.
So the really super crappy thing about this treaty was that it was signed by Irish plenipotentiaries, which is just a really big word that means “[Irish] dudes are gonna sign this without having to reference their superiors shit is gonna go down oh my god it is not going to be pretty.” Though there’s no comic for it, I’ll just say that it was because of this (rather, pro-treaty supporters and anti-treaty supporters) that Ireland was met with a civil war between 1922-1923. (Spoiler alert: The people who didn’t like the treaty lost the war.)
BUT back to Norn because I love him and he’s adorable and growing up.Now. I didn’t really get a feel for how the people of Northern Ireland felt about becoming an autonomous nation within the UK, but considering that they took up the offer within two days - out of 30 - I think it’s safe to say they were just fine with stickin’ with the UK. And for understandable reason. (I say this only for the sake of the era.)Remember how Ulster Plantation was settled by Scotland and England? Those who did go to Ulster were largely Protestant. People in Ireland were generally Catholic. So ideas clashed, culture clashed—not very pretty. Not to say that there weren’t any Catholics in Northern Ireland, or Protestants in Ireland, because … there were. Just not a huge amount.Leading into the following comic, it is my opinion that, and this may just be the hopeless and idealistic American within me talking, we should never have to live in a world where we fear being hated or discriminated against for our race, creed, language, size, sexuality—the list goes on. After all of these amazing civil rights advancements, all over the world, in the 20th century, you would think that hey, people might start getting along, right?Oh; it is a very naïve thought.
(I’d like to point out that I am one of those naïve people.)
Oh look! Links!
A quick, small video that touches on something I didn’t cover. It’s got some pretty cool background music, and footage. *A*More informationnnn!Some important people giving some info and their opinions on the times!
!!!
Stay tuned for an important Public Service Announcement!

CONTINUING ON FROM LAST TIME!!

What we see here is, kinda, the end of the Irish War for Independence. That paper England is handing over to Ireland is the Anglo-Irish Treaty. (I’d like to take this quick moment to point out that the Irish War for Independence was also known as the Anglo Irish War, and the (Black and) Tan War.)

What it essentially did was—hmm. The problem with the treaty was—nngh. Okay, good things out of the way, first: Ended the war. Yay! Provided the possibility of an autonomous Northern Ireland. Yay! Reduced number of British troops in Ireland. Yay! Ireland was no longer part of the UK. Yay! Everybody is as happy as a duck on a floaty. Yeah, that’s sarcasm. The, “Eh,” things: Ireland would no longer be part of the UK, but it was still part of the British Dominion, with the British Monarch still its Head of State. Ireland would also pay proportional debt to Britain from the war. So the kinda-dick-moves-but-should-have-been-expected-because-that’s-just-how-wars-and-treaties-work-and-we-have-to-get-used-to-it things: Britain would still control ports for security purposes. Ehh. The treaty would stand superior in Irish law.

The treaty would stand superior in Irish law. What this meant was that no matter what happened, this treaty would stand above anything. :| Wow.

So the really super crappy thing about this treaty was that it was signed by Irish plenipotentiaries, which is just a really big word that means “[Irish] dudes are gonna sign this without having to reference their superiors shit is gonna go down oh my god it is not going to be pretty.” Though there’s no comic for it, I’ll just say that it was because of this (rather, pro-treaty supporters and anti-treaty supporters) that Ireland was met with a civil war between 1922-1923. (Spoiler alert: The people who didn’t like the treaty lost the war.)

BUT back to Norn because I love him and he’s adorable and growing up.

Now. I didn’t really get a feel for how the people of Northern Ireland felt about becoming an autonomous nation within the UK, but considering that they took up the offer within two days - out of 30 - I think it’s safe to say they were just fine with stickin’ with the UK. And for understandable reason. (I say this only for the sake of the era.)

Remember how Ulster Plantation was settled by Scotland and England? Those who did go to Ulster were largely Protestant. People in Ireland were generally Catholic. So ideas clashed, culture clashed—not very pretty. Not to say that there weren’t any Catholics in Northern Ireland, or Protestants in Ireland, because … there were. Just not a huge amount.

Leading into the following comic, it is my opinion that, and this may just be the hopeless and idealistic American within me talking, we should never have to live in a world where we fear being hated or discriminated against for our race, creed, language, size, sexuality—the list goes on. After all of these amazing civil rights advancements, all over the world, in the 20th century, you would think that hey, people might start getting along, right?

Oh; it is a very naïve thought.

(I’d like to point out that I am one of those naïve people.)

Oh look! Links!

A quick, small video that touches on something I didn’t cover. It’s got some pretty cool background music, and footage. *A*
More informationnnn!
Some important people giving some info and their opinions on the times!

!!!

Stay tuned for an important Public Service Announcement!

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland british isles europe anglo-irish treaty anglo irish war irish war for independence 1901-1950 CE

126 notes

AANNNND WE’RE BACK! Didja miss us? No worries, we’ve not forgotten you—life just kinda attacked us at the most inopportune times. School and work, contests, deadlines, vacations. These have been waiting to be shown to everyone, and now they’re getting their chance. (Just some FYI, the next couple strips will be released slowly, once a day to every two days.) Anyway, on with this comic!
Ahh, the double-edged sword.To be fair, there is my own twist on this one. Honestly, guys, I was turning pages in my library books and webpages, and after a few hours went, “What.” SO. To spare you guys headaches, I’m keeping this one as to-the-point as absolutely possible, and without terms that haven’t been used in the comics. (Such as Sinn Fein and IRA. If you know what they are, cool. If you don’t, it’s okay; I promise. You don’t need to know them to understand the bare basics of what’s going on. We are not judging you! :)BASICALLY. Ireland, while doing what was in their best interest, never really wanted to be part of the United Kingdom. And you know? Good on ‘em; fighting for what you believe in is a highly-valued trait we like to support, right? Right! Thing is, if you’re fighting a war for anything, you gotta have the right provisions. You have to have enough food, enough ammo/supplies/weapons, and people. Sadly, it was for lack of these things that began to bring the Irish War for Independence to a halt.Key word in that last sentence? Began. While they were indeed hurting badly for those things, and it was looking Entirely Not That Great, the people in England were tired of the war. Granted, I don’t think they truly understood what was going on. You live in a First World nation, and you can’t really imagine war being fought downtown, can you? (Granted it was in Ireland and not in England.) But at the same time, that ignorance doesn’t matter when your husband, son, uncle, friend, whomever is going across the Irish Sea to ‘fight.’ You don’t want them there! Who does, amirite? So the English people are complaining and are very Do Not Want, but then they see just how … destructive the war is. Like, literally destructive, and bloody, and it’s being fought by a very driven Ireland.So the English offer up a truce, basically. They know just what buttons to press, but that puts the Irish in a Super Awkward Position. They can surrender, but that means losing. Or, they can keep fighting—but they’d still, ultimately, end up losing. (Lack of supplies, men, etc.) So this truce is brought up and it’s known as the Anglo-Irish Treaty, which is great and all, but only in that it brings the war to an end. By … definition, I guess.
But that’s a story for the next strip. :) (Including links! Damn you, Chrome, losing my tabs….)

AANNNND WE’RE BACK! Didja miss us? No worries, we’ve not forgotten you—life just kinda attacked us at the most inopportune times. School and work, contests, deadlines, vacations. These have been waiting to be shown to everyone, and now they’re getting their chance. (Just some FYI, the next couple strips will be released slowly, once a day to every two days.) Anyway, on with this comic!

Ahh, the double-edged sword.

To be fair, there is my own twist on this one. Honestly, guys, I was turning pages in my library books and webpages, and after a few hours went, “What.” SO. To spare you guys headaches, I’m keeping this one as to-the-point as absolutely possible, and without terms that haven’t been used in the comics. (Such as Sinn Fein and IRA. If you know what they are, cool. If you don’t, it’s okay; I promise. You don’t need to know them to understand the bare basics of what’s going on. We are not judging you! :)

BASICALLY. Ireland, while doing what was in their best interest, never really wanted to be part of the United Kingdom. And you know? Good on ‘em; fighting for what you believe in is a highly-valued trait we like to support, right? Right! Thing is, if you’re fighting a war for anything, you gotta have the right provisions. You have to have enough food, enough ammo/supplies/weapons, and people. Sadly, it was for lack of these things that began to bring the Irish War for Independence to a halt.

Key word in that last sentence? Began

While they were indeed hurting badly for those things, and it was looking Entirely Not That Great, the people in England were tired of the war. Granted, I don’t think they truly understood what was going on. You live in a First World nation, and you can’t really imagine war being fought downtown, can you? (Granted it was in Ireland and not in England.) But at the same time, that ignorance doesn’t matter when your husband, son, uncle, friend, whomever is going across the Irish Sea to ‘fight.’ You don’t want them there! Who does, amirite? So the English people are complaining and are very Do Not Want, but then they see just how … destructive the war is. Like, literally destructive, and bloody, and it’s being fought by a very driven Ireland.

So the English offer up a truce, basically. They know just what buttons to press, but that puts the Irish in a Super Awkward Position. They can surrender, but that means losing. Or, they can keep fighting—but they’d still, ultimately, end up losing. (Lack of supplies, men, etc.) So this truce is brought up and it’s known as the Anglo-Irish Treaty, which is great and all, but only in that it brings the war to an end. By … definition, I guess.

But that’s a story for the next strip. :) (Including links! Damn you, Chrome, losing my tabs….)

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland british isles europe irish war for independence anglo irish war 1901-1950 CE

73 notes

So this is gonna be super summed up, because when it comes to Ireland, there is a lot of information about the smallest things. So you can imagine how much information there is for larger, ah, events. (As a side-note, we just chose generic uniforms for this. Any opinions?)
Cue Easter Rising, 1916. Summed up: Ireland wasn’t happy with being a part of the United Kingdom, so those who wished for Ireland’s independence (remember the Irish Rebellion comic? yup) decided to get England’s attention. In a very flashy and … bloody way. (I’ve determined that it is virtually impossible to do anything progressive in the British Isles without there being some kind of bloodshed.) 
For this, in 1916 (and 1917 in the comic, of course) was, of course, the Great War (World War I). Ireland had actually been giving Great Britain so much trouble, that Germany was actually thankful that they may not join the war, and make it easier for them (the Germans). Of course, as we know, that … didn’t happen.
This particular, violent upset lasted from Easter Monday, the 24th, to the following 30th, in 1916. The comic takes place in 1917, after the uprising, but there was violence going on here and there. You know. Nothing bad. 8|b (Uh, that’s sarcasm, right thurr.) This event, along with several others, were precursors to the Irish War of Independence. (The actual war didn’t start of 1919, though.)
There’s only so much information I can give you in this comic without totally confusing you as to which way is up, I’m not even kidding. More shall be explained next month with the continuation of the Irish War of Independence! 8D
LINKS:
1966 CommemorationOnline ExhibitionFurther Information

So this is gonna be super summed up, because when it comes to Ireland, there is a lot of information about the smallest things. So you can imagine how much information there is for larger, ah, events. (As a side-note, we just chose generic uniforms for this. Any opinions?)

Cue Easter Rising, 1916. Summed up: Ireland wasn’t happy with being a part of the United Kingdom, so those who wished for Ireland’s independence (remember the Irish Rebellion comic? yup) decided to get England’s attention. In a very flashy and … bloody way. (I’ve determined that it is virtually impossible to do anything progressive in the British Isles without there being some kind of bloodshed.) 

For this, in 1916 (and 1917 in the comic, of course) was, of course, the Great War (World War I). Ireland had actually been giving Great Britain so much trouble, that Germany was actually thankful that they may not join the war, and make it easier for them (the Germans). Of course, as we know, that … didn’t happen.

This particular, violent upset lasted from Easter Monday, the 24th, to the following 30th, in 1916. The comic takes place in 1917, after the uprising, but there was violence going on here and there. You know. Nothing bad. 8|b (Uh, that’s sarcasm, right thurr.) This event, along with several others, were precursors to the Irish War of Independence. (The actual war didn’t start of 1919, though.)

There’s only so much information I can give you in this comic without totally confusing you as to which way is up, I’m not even kidding. More shall be explained next month with the continuation of the Irish War of Independence! 8D

LINKS:

1966 Commemoration
Online Exhibition
Further Information

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland british isles europe anglo irish war easter rising irish war for independence 1901-1950 CE

149 notes

EEEE ISN’T HE ADORABLE I JUST WANNA. HUG HIM. He’s so cute he’s so cute he’s so cuuuute.
SO ULSTER PLANTATION!! You can basically say that Ulster Plantation was the ‘birth’ of ‘Northern Ireland.’ Different ‘culture’, and all, I suppose? Now, as I’ve mentioned previously, Northern Ireland isn’t actually a country until much much later. But hey, America was around as a kid and wasn’t a country yet, so there ya go; there’s my reasoning. That’s all this comic is really doing? Northern Ireland is important, and I feel it’s often overlooked, much like Wales. :( Plus, we have to introduce him some time, right??
Well, that said, there are really no links for this that you can find in that Giant List of Links from the last comic about Ulster Plantation.
(Extra: The year in the tags is just my own estimation of when Northern Ireland, the character, may have actually appeared.)

EEEE ISN’T HE ADORABLE I JUST WANNA. HUG HIM. He’s so cute he’s so cute he’s so cuuuute.

SO ULSTER PLANTATION!! You can basically say that Ulster Plantation was the ‘birth’ of ‘Northern Ireland.’ Different ‘culture’, and all, I suppose? Now, as I’ve mentioned previously, Northern Ireland isn’t actually a country until much much later. But hey, America was around as a kid and wasn’t a country yet, so there ya go; there’s my reasoning. That’s all this comic is really doing? Northern Ireland is important, and I feel it’s often overlooked, much like Wales. :( Plus, we have to introduce him some time, right??

Well, that said, there are really no links for this that you can find in that Giant List of Links from the last comic about Ulster Plantation.

(Extra: The year in the tags is just my own estimation of when Northern Ireland, the character, may have actually appeared.)

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: northern ireland aph: scotland aph: wales british isles europe ulster plantation 1751-1800 CE

94 notes

Ah! Ireland! Nice to see more of you. :)
As for Ulster Plantation, there’s not really a whole lot! Well, there is, but not (too much) in this comic. This is what you need to know:
England has this need to take over everything, right? Right. No one’s arguing this. Well, Ireland was certainly not an exception, but Ireland was (and is) certainly no pushover. (Wales and Scotland aren’t either! But there’s a reason they’re often called the Fighting Irish!) 
Technically, the Tudors had in fact taken over Ireland. Henry VIII had been king of Ireland, Elizabeth I, and James (I of England, VI of Scotland). Just cuz they ruled over Ireland, doesn’t mean that a whole lot of English were over there. So that’s what Ulster is for! The earls of northern Ireland had fled from the English (and Scots) to try and get help when forces advanced to take over the area, but whatever help they went to find never … happened. So, British parliament had taken over this area, Ulster Plantation, and assigned each county to either England or Scotland, though some were shared by both states. You don’t see Wales mentioned, do you? :( (As you can see in the comic, Scotland and England are still arguing.)
There were, mainly, three peoples living in the area: English, Irish (both those loyal to Great Britain and those … not-so-loyal), and Scottish. Today, much of the population is still the same/descended from them.
Ulster, soon, would become something much more.
LINKS:
Plantation of UlsterTons of Links o___o

Ah! Ireland! Nice to see more of you. :)

As for Ulster Plantation, there’s not really a whole lot! Well, there is, but not (too much) in this comic. This is what you need to know:

England has this need to take over everything, right? Right. No one’s arguing this. Well, Ireland was certainly not an exception, but Ireland was (and is) certainly no pushover. (Wales and Scotland aren’t either! But there’s a reason they’re often called the Fighting Irish!) 

Technically, the Tudors had in fact taken over Ireland. Henry VIII had been king of Ireland, Elizabeth I, and James (I of England, VI of Scotland). Just cuz they ruled over Ireland, doesn’t mean that a whole lot of English were over there. So that’s what Ulster is for! The earls of northern Ireland had fled from the English (and Scots) to try and get help when forces advanced to take over the area, but whatever help they went to find never … happened. So, British parliament had taken over this area, Ulster Plantation, and assigned each county to either England or Scotland, though some were shared by both states. You don’t see Wales mentioned, do you? :( (As you can see in the comic, Scotland and England are still arguing.)

There were, mainly, three peoples living in the area: English, Irish (both those loyal to Great Britain and those … not-so-loyal), and Scottish. Today, much of the population is still the same/descended from them.

Ulster, soon, would become something much more.

LINKS:

Plantation of Ulster
Tons of Links o___o

Filed under aph: england aph: ireland aph: scotland british isles europe ulster plantation 1601-1650 CE

123 notes

Can you tell how much time Sires had to work on this one? (Answer: A while.) All that designing on Henry’s shirt? Yup. 8|b
The official title of this comic is: “An Acte for Laws & Justice to be ministred in Wales in like fourme as it is in this Realme,” which is also the name of the act that is being put in place in the comic! It’s shortened form is “Laws in Wales Act 1535.” Why the year specification? There were technically two acts passed (the latter in 1542), but as far as I can tell? They’re basically one-in-the-same. Just that the first was passed without Welsh representation.
So we have the infamous (notorious??) King Henry the VIII, of the Tudor dynasty! Now, the Tudors (and I know I mentioned this before), were descended from the (rather large and influential) Tudur family of Wales. In fact, Henry VIII’s father, Henry VII, was the first Tudor monarch!
Anywho, the point of the comic. This was Henry VIII basically being made paranoid about the Welsh by a man named Thomas Cromwell, his chief advisor. He perceived a threat that the Welsh were going to rise up, so rather than let himself be put through the trouble, he decided to (officially) annex Wales, putting it (officially) under English rule. (Because I guess they really hadn’t before. Honestly. Politics. Aish.) 
Now, the act annexes Wales, right? And you’d think that the Welsh are getting a good deal! In fact, the act was not met with disdain from Welsh citizens. Among both gentry and lesser castes, the act was, for lack of a better word, welcomed. They would have representation in parliament, and they were being made equal citizens! They just … couldn’t speak Welsh. (It’s like the English have a grudge against the language, or something.) So pretty much, it’s always a double-edged sword when England tries doing this stuff, isn’t it? (I’ve noticed this trend….)
The acts have been known (since 1901) as the Acts of Union, and were repealed by the Welsh Language Act. 
In 1993. :| (Just a few centuries late, guys!!)
A few other things are in the comic—you see Anne Boleyn, and little Elizabeth. I’d explain, but…. That’s why we have links! I have a link for the acts, but there’s not too much to them. 8)
ps: I’ll add the tags in a jif, and finish posting these up asap!! Busy day!
LINKS:
Text of the Laws in Wales Act (1535) (Scroll down just a few clicks.)Easier text of the above Henry VIII!  (Search around for his wives!)British Monarchs 

Can you tell how much time Sires had to work on this one? (Answer: A while.) All that designing on Henry’s shirt? Yup. 8|b

The official title of this comic is: “An Acte for Laws & Justice to be ministred in Wales in like fourme as it is in this Realme,” which is also the name of the act that is being put in place in the comic! It’s shortened form is “Laws in Wales Act 1535.” Why the year specification? There were technically two acts passed (the latter in 1542), but as far as I can tell? They’re basically one-in-the-same. Just that the first was passed without Welsh representation.

So we have the infamous (notorious??) King Henry the VIII, of the Tudor dynasty! Now, the Tudors (and I know I mentioned this before), were descended from the (rather large and influential) Tudur family of Wales. In fact, Henry VIII’s father, Henry VII, was the first Tudor monarch!

Anywho, the point of the comic. This was Henry VIII basically being made paranoid about the Welsh by a man named Thomas Cromwell, his chief advisor. He perceived a threat that the Welsh were going to rise up, so rather than let himself be put through the trouble, he decided to (officially) annex Wales, putting it (officially) under English rule. (Because I guess they really hadn’t before. Honestly. Politics. Aish.) 

Now, the act annexes Wales, right? And you’d think that the Welsh are getting a good deal! In fact, the act was not met with disdain from Welsh citizens. Among both gentry and lesser castes, the act was, for lack of a better word, welcomed. They would have representation in parliament, and they were being made equal citizens! They just … couldn’t speak Welsh. (It’s like the English have a grudge against the language, or something.) So pretty much, it’s always a double-edged sword when England tries doing this stuff, isn’t it? (I’ve noticed this trend….)

The acts have been known (since 1901) as the Acts of Union, and were repealed by the Welsh Language Act. 

In 1993. :| (Just a few centuries late, guys!!)

A few other things are in the comic—you see Anne Boleyn, and little Elizabeth. I’d explain, but…. That’s why we have links! I have a link for the acts, but there’s not too much to them. 8)

ps: I’ll add the tags in a jif, and finish posting these up asap!! Busy day!

LINKS:

Text of the Laws in Wales Act (1535) (Scroll down just a few clicks.)
Easier text of the above 
Henry VIII!  (Search around for his wives!)
British Monarchs 

Filed under aph: england aph: wales henry viii british isles europe laws in wales acts 1501-1550 CE